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OUR STORY

The Daughters of the American Revolution, founded in 1890 and headquartered in Washington, D.C., is a non-profit, non-political volunteer women's service organization dedicated to promoting patriotism, preserving American history, and securing America's future through better education for children.

Organized on December 2, 1907 by Mrs. Maude Allen Klotz and granted its charter on January 11, 1908, the Ketewamoke Chapter of the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution was incorporated in 1913. Our historic chapter house in Huntington, New York was built in 1837 for the First Universalist Society, a church for all denominations. The building continued to be used as a church until 1868, when it was converted into a parsonage. Because the lot was small, the building was placed with its side to the road and its main entrance was on the north side. Jarvis Lefferts was the chosen builder. The building site, which was purchased from Ebenezer Gould and his wife, Lavina, cost $100.00. On April 2, 1914, the recently-incorporated Ketewamoke Chapter, NSDAR purchased the house for $2,500.00. By 1925, more room was needed for meetings and some partitions that had been added were removed. The entrance was again changed to the north side of the house, while a one-story flat roof vestibule was added. On August 25, 1931, the chapter's mortgage note was burned and the ashes placed in a small glass bottle that is now to be found within the kettle hanging in the dining room's fireplace. 


Our chapter house is now on the National Register of Historic Places, and it is one of our missions as a chapter to preserve this historic house.

OUR STORY

The National Society Daughters of the American Revolution (NSDAR or DAR), founded in 1890 and headquartered in Washington, D.C., is a non-profit, non-political volunteer women's service organization dedicated to promoting patriotism, preserving American history, and securing America's future through better education for children.

Organized on December 2, 1907, by Maude Allen Klotz and granted its charter on January 11, 1908, the Ketewamoke Chapter NSDAR was incorporated in 1913. Our historic chapter house in Huntington, New York, was built in 1837 for the First Universalist Society, a church for all denominations. The building continued to be used as a church until 1868, when it was converted into a parsonage. Because the lot was small, the building was placed with its side to the road, and its main entrance was on the north side. Jarvis Lefferts was the chosen builder. The building site, which was purchased from Ebenezer Gould and his wife, Lavina, cost $100.00. On April 2, 1914, the recently-incorporated Ketewamoke Chapter NSDAR purchased the house for $2,500.00. By 1925, more room was needed for meetings and some partitions that had been added were removed. The entrance was again changed to the north side of the house, while a one-story flat roof vestibule was added. On August 25, 1931, the chapter's mortgage note was burned and the ashes placed in a small glass bottle that is now to be found within the kettle hanging in the dining room's fireplace. 


Our chapter house is now on the National Register of Historic Places, and it is one of our missions as a chapter to preserve this historic house.

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Carrie Dusenberry (née Aitkin), born about 1875 in Huntington, New York. Early member of Ketewamoke Chapter NSDAR

Mission Dolores Bell, 1776

Maude Allen Klotz

Organizing Regent, Ketewamoke Chapter NSDAR

A History of our chapter from

Our Town Huntington:

A Pictorial History of Huntington in Commemoration of its Tercentenary,

1653-1953 

"Ketewamoke Chapter, National Society, Daughters of the American Revolution — the oldest Chapter on Long Island outside the New York City area — held its first meeting on Monday, December 1, 1907, at the home of the Organizing Regent, Mrs. Maude Allen Klots, with the following becoming Charter Members: Mrs. Maude Allen Klots, Mrs. Bertha U. Conklin, Mrs. Caroline W. Downs, Mrs. Mary F. Gaines, Mrs. Louise P. Hill, Miss Sarah Frances Holden, Miss Elizabeth D. Irwin, Mrs. Julia A. Irwin, Miss Nettie E. Pearsall, Mrs. Eva Prime, Mrs. May W. Rogers, Mrs. Mary C. Sammis, Mrs. Georgiana P. Statesir, Miss Ella R. Sutton, Mrs. Catherine Townsend, Mrs. Lydia F. Underhill, Mrs. Ellen P. Willard, Mrs. May Hartshorn Wood, Miss Bertha L. Young, Miss Ethel F. Young."

"The Chapter name was chosen to honor the original land purchase of Huntington, called "Ketewamoke" (by the calm waters) from the Indians in 1653. The Chapter flourished and in 1914 purchased its own Chapter House, pictured above. Located opposite the Old Cemetery on Nassau Road, the building was erected in 1837 as a Universalist Church; converted to a Parsonage in 1868; and sold when the Society disbanded in 1913. Through their own efforts, the Chapter members now own their "house" unencumbered, have restored it to its original appearance, furnished it with many interesting, historical items, and are finishing the last of the interior decorating, in time for the Tercentenary Celebration, when "open house" will be maintained, with the Daughters serving as hostesses to both Huntingtonians and out-of-town visitors."

"The 1952-3 Officers are: Regent, Mrs. Ronald A. Fullerton; 1st Vice Regent, Mrs. Harry A. Taylor; 2nd Vice Regent, Mrs. Edward Heil; Chaplain, Miss Augustine L. Scudder; Recording Secretary, Mrs. Lawrence Walsh; Corr. Secretary, Mrs. Francis O. Collas ; Treasurer, Miss Edna T. Conklin ; Registrar, Miss Madeleine Badetty; Historians, Mrs. Walter A. Cowell, Miss Emily E. Badetty; Librarian, Miss Ethel M. Conklin; Curator, Miss Katherine M. Williams; Honorary Chaplain, Rev. William S. Hess; Elected Board Members, Mrs. Henry D. Bixby, Mrs. Jesse Corwin, Mrs. E. R. Malito, Mrs. Nicholas Schling, Mrs. Eugene P. Willets."

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